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Accelerated BSN programs generally are designed for those who wish to enter the nursing profession with a bachelor's degree but who have not yet completed a four year degree program. Such programs capitalize on the student's academic and professional maturity, and offer credit for course work already completed, moving them to the “but I would rather be a nursing assistant” stage of license-readiness quicker.

The first thing to do is to decide what field you wish to pursue, and look at accelerated BSN programs that fit your personality and experience in an accredited program. This will help you get a good sense of what the program offers and whether it suits your needs. Also, consider the level of clinical education the program offers; if your goal is a job as an RN, a few more months of clinical training is a must.

Once you know exactly what your goals are, contact the accelerated BSN program coordinator and let her or him know. If you already have a job lined up, tell them and try to schedule an interview. Most of the time they can schedule one for you.

Once you have an interview, the accelerated BSN program coordinator will explain the benefits of the program, explain how much clinical time is required, and tell you about the specific requirements for each state where the program is offered. They will also inform you of the financial and emotional aspects of completing this program. You may even be asked to submit letters of interest to the program coordinator or hospital to show interest in the program and the nurses.

The program usually begins around the third or fourth month of your BSN program, which means you should complete your first clinical year around the fourth year. In some programs you may be able to complete the program faster than the stated timeline but you should always check with your program administrator to verify. After completing the clinical part, you will have to take an exam to determine if you have met the state licensing requirements and obtain an RN license upon completion of the BSN. in order to continue your career as a licensed RN.

Most accelerated BSN programs offer the option of a clinical rotational program, so that you can gain practical experience working with actual patients right after you finish your BSN program. A clinical rotation is a good way to gain clinical skills and real-life experience with a nurse before you begin your career as a licensed RN. A lot of nurses choose this option as a way to gain practical nursing skills because they want to work with people and situations immediately before they start working in the RN positions.

In addition to the clinical rotation, accelerated BSN programs often offer the opportunity to participate in hands-on clinical rotations, allowing the student to work directly with nurses. hands-on clinical rotations allow you to work directly with patients and to get to know the medical world while still maintaining your BSN degree.

You should be aware that many accelerated BSN programs also have the added benefit of having a placement service for the students. These placement services are staffed by nurses who work directly with the students once they complete the program, offering information on hospitals, and other medical facilities where the students wish to work. In many cases the placement service also has a clinical support department with a full team of nurses to assist the students throughout their career as a Registered Nurse.

You will also find that a lot of accelerated BSN programs have a clinical internship program. This internship allows you . . . . . . to work directly with a registered nurse during their first few weeks as an RN. This internship helps you gain valuable clinical experience that is essential to success as a Registered Nurse.

In terms of the clinical rotations in most accelerated BSN programs, there are four clinical rotations that are usually available, depending on the program. If you wish to take an accelerated BSN program that offers these rotations, you should do an assessment of each of the four rotations before you begin the program in order to ensure that you have a solid foundation in the clinical skills that are required for the field.

The clinical rotations are usually completed in eight weeks with two weeks of on and one week off. Typically, you will spend two weeks directly in the clinic with a registered nurse, with the remainder of the time at home. Some programs offer one week at home clinical rotations and one week onsite clinical rotations for those who prefer to stay onsite.

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